Review: Is the Sony PS-HX500 the ripping turntable we have been waiting for?

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The Sony PS-HX500’s all black exterior will have you hearing in colour.

Recording your vinyl records (lps, 12″s, 45s) to digital files can be a costly, precarious, time consuming task, where the results can often be underwhelming. I am by no means an audiophile, but a dj who has collected thousands of records over the years, and I know enough that the better it sounds, the better it is for djing and listening. Now that digital djing has become so much apart of what I do, I still long for digital copies of those records in my collection that are unavailable elsewhere or, in some cases, they are not decent rips (Youtube rips, illegal sites, 128kb rips of yesteryear). So, my review is going to be looking at what many of the other reviewers of the Sony PS-HX500 don’t cover, while focusing on the Sony PS-HX500’s ripping capabilities (not its phono stage or sound replication in a stereo set up, maybe for a latter post). I am going to be asking:

  1. How do “natural” recordings from the Sony PS-HX500 sound?
  2. Does the Sony PS-HX500 rip club records well?
  3. Is the Sony PS-HX500 kind to scratchy records?
  4. Does the Sony PS-HX500 rip 45s / 7″ records well?
  5. How does the Sony PS-HX500 compare to my current dj set up for ripping records?

  1. How do “natural” recordings from the Sony PS-HX500 sound?

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I found many of the other reviews focused on the Rock and Jazz LPs, which because they have that nuance of live instruments seems like a reasonable first approach. For that, I decided to begin with a reissue Alice Coltrane ‎– “Journey In Satchidananda”. Not only does it have live instrumentation but the harp is a very vibrant instrument with sweeping highs and mids (probably hard to capture digitally I figure). For rock I used another reissue, here Black Sabbath’s Self titled debut.

The results across the board were excellent for the recordings. Alice’s harp rings through with great clarity, the double bass bumps, Cymbals glisten. You could here the room reverberation that they were playing. Black Sabbath sounded great. The rainy intro of did expose a little surface crackle in my copy but as soon as the thunder kicks in it sounded great. The instruments (bass, guitar, vocals & drums) were allowed to play their respective roles and were easily accessible.

2. Does the Sony PS-HX500 rip club records well?

In contrast, with the more “natural” sounds of microphoned instruments, I wanted to compare it with more modern recordings with some bump, ie some “club” records. For this example I used Jay-Z’s  ‎– “Vol. 3… Life And Times Of S. Carter” .  The results In comparison to a digital copy I had, “Big Pimpin'” sounded remarkably close, taking in consideration the limitations of a 33 1/3 record with 3 songs on the one side. The recording had good low-end with the kicks coming through as they should without detracting from the vocals. The vocals coasted on top with good clarity. The stereo spectrum was a bit more narrow but I think that has more to do with the medium itself more than a fault with the turntable.

3. Is the Sony PS-HX500 kind to scratchy records?

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If your ghettohouse records don’t have the wrong sleeves send them back, “they ain’t ghetto enough”

For my scratchy record (which could also arguably double as another “club” record) I used a Dance Mania test of DJ Chip – “Ghettoslide” . The condition of the vinyl is probably VG with lots of scratches. It was well loved soldier of the clubs, hence the wrong sleeve. Furthermore, Dance Mania records are NOT world renown because of their quality pressings and I can’t imagine their white labels faired better. However, the results of the recordings made on the Sony PS-HX500 were relatively kind. Surface noise from the scratches were heard but ultimately the music came through with good balance (lows, mids & highs). One thing that was remarkable, the vocals although manically stacked,were more discernible. I could here all the nasty words clearly. With a little bit of post-production finesse you could definitely get a good usable digital file I think. Something like the Izotope RX7 editor software (which I will do a review of shortly).

4. Does the Sony PS-HX500 rip 45s / 7″ records well?

I am a 45 fanatic. In fact my lp/12″ collecting has more or less subsided. Whereas I still have to look when I see some 45s. However, 45s are more often then not the greatest fidelity. When you dj them they often need a lot of eq to get them right. But needless to say I still wanted to be able to rip those impossible to find cuts. So I tried various 45s of varying condition: High Rollers – “Place Your Bets” a Canadian disco cut; Fuji – “Revalations” a psych blues funk cut; Errol Scorcher ‎– “Roach In De Corner” a Jamaican pressing (not exactly a quality pressing or condition); Bobby Marchan ‎– “Rockin’ Pneumonia” a rock n roll romp.

Across the board really good results. A little tininess you would expect from a 45 and little crackle. But really good clarity, and good lows particularly from the “Roach In De Corner”

5. How does the Sony PS-HX500 compare to my current dj set up for ripping records?

Compared to my other set ups (and many djs will have the same equipment): a Technics 1200, various carts (Shure N44-7, Jico N44-7, Ortofon S-120), various mixers (Pioneer S9, Rane TTM-57sl and Roland DJ-505 controller) using the Serato software (Scratch Live & Serato DJ), the recordings of the same records didn’t even compare, I would say 40% better or more. Every single time the Sony PS-HX500 out did these set ups. The clarity was not only apparent to my ears but when I load the files in Serato (without any tinkering), you didn’t get these “all one colour” waveforms, like with Serato’s all red waveform vinyl rips. Suggesting a wider spectrum of sound. The only thing I think would be required to make excellent “ready for the club” rips, would be an ounce of preparation (clean your records) and a bit of post production (gain, eq). The gain on the Sony recordings were really low, but this could be seen as a positive in the sense that you can add more and it give you ample wiggle room to do so.

Conclusion

I would highly recommend the Sony PS-HX500 as a usb turntable for ripping records. I got really good results that surpassed all the other popular DJ set ups I had . I think I will definitely change the cart it came with (something that I will cover in another review) to hopefully yield even better results. The cartridge it comes with is supposedly an unmarked $50 Audio-technica cart and needle. Because of this I am ripping my really scratchy records first before purchasing another cartridge. The cartridges are not easily swappable and needs to be installed with a bit of finesse and wired.

Pros:

  • All in one belt-drive turntable with phono stage & usb that doesn’t actually suck.
  • Good price and value
  • Recordings are excellent and are kind to all genres.
  • 33/45 switch on top means no belt adjustment required to play at different speeds.
  • Comes with recording software that is easy to use, available here.
  • Records 16/24 bit .wav files but can also record using Sony’s propriety DSD format.

Cons:

  • the stock needle it comes with is just ok.
  • Needle replacement may be difficult (I will find out later)
  • No height adjustment for the arm means only particular carts of a certain height will work.
  • Legs are not adjustable,
  • Arm is not automatic (I am going to look to see if an automatic lift can be installed).
  • For the best results you will probably need a better audio software editor to do a little bit of post tinkering, but there are free ones (e.g. Audacity).

 

 

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The Approach (with Caution)

As part of of my ongoing blog posts regarding iTunes editing/cleaning from a dj’s perspective but could also useful to anybody who has extensive collection.

Once I knew I wanted to clean up my library and update my OS,  my next question was:

Should I edited my library first before I update the OS or just add everything back after the OS and edit my collection later?

If things are time sensitive, ie you are burning to have that piece of gear or if you think editing your library may take forever, then you may want to move everything and edit your library. I decided it would better to go through my library first, clean house and then back it up and re-add everything after the OS update. In my mind, if I was going to go through the trouble of adding back my library, I was going to avoid adding back useless files after the update. Plus, freeing up space to make the computer run more smoothly can never be a bad thing. So, better to go through the library beforehand.

Now what is your best approach?  The best thing to do is to look for unwanted files:

  • Duplicates
  • Bad Files (corrupted files, bad audio quality files)
  • Files you don’t play or probably will never play 

I will go through each of these subjects as I progress. I am looking forward to going through my collection, making changes where I can and marking the progress. I will bring up the challenges as they come up.

Editing Your Digital Music Library

“January can be the cruelest month for working DJs” (- a wise poet) once you get passed that holiday party blitz of December, which often culminates into New Year’s Eve. But for those that have a little (more) down time it presents an opportunity to “do stuff”. To get things in order. To not only take spiritual stock but to also take physical stock. So, for me I decided to take on the arduous task of cleaning out my Mac (a 2.6 ghz, Intel Core i5), which I use for djing. The mac which I have been using in professional and a personal capacity is at its… capacity (funny enough). The hard drive (1TB) is maxed out more or less, with about 10 gb left, which is unadvisable. In Serato, you begin to see weird activity: visual dropouts and slowness, which is unacceptable. Performatively, it can be stifling.

So, I figured why not take full advantage and update the OS as well and wipe the drive, start “fresh”. I figured its the sure fire way of getting rid of anything unnecessary (why do I have 100 gigs of “other” files in system info). Besides, I have been interested in getting a dj controller for gigging. I have always been a turntable guy, but carrying turntables these days seems overkill. Often, when you show up, there isn’t even enough room for them. Also, people’s expectations have changed. I could go over the pros and cons (perhaps in future blog) but now I digress. So, I am hoping to get a dj controller, however, a lot of the newer generation controllers require at least 10.10 (Yosemite), notably the Roland DJ controller series. Laugh, yes I am on 10.9. but I have always been of the mind: why update unless its for specific software or hardware? For the emojis? Plus, in light of recent news regarding Apples phones, I wouldn’t put it past them regarding their computers. They said they don’t but they weren’t so forthcoming about their phones. Anyways, I figure 10.10 shouldn’t be totally debilitating to my 4/5 year old mac.

So, this is the plan: to edit my library & update the OS. The process is going to take quite a bit of time, but I expect it to be an enlightening experience. So, I am going to do some blog posts regarding this and the issues raised as they come up.