How to Replace the Sony PS-HX500 stock cartridge with the Nagaoka MP-110

Replacing the Sony PS-HX500 stock cartridge with the Nagaoka MP-110
Difficulty: Medium
Time duration: 30 minutes to an hour

After my favourable reviews of the Sony PS-HX500 more than a year ago, and with idle time during self-isolation, I decided it was time to replace the factory needle on the Sony PS-HX500. My first decision was which cartridge?



More Audio Tech:
REVIEW: IS THE SONY PS-HX500 THE USB RIPPING TURNTABLE WE HAVE BEEN WAITING FOR?
PRESONUS ERIS E3.5 SPEAKERS FOR A HOME DJ SET UP (REVIEW)


Which Cart for the Sony PS-HX500?

There are many things to consider when replacing your needle on the Sony PS-HX500. Firstly, it needs to be a moving magnet cartridge. Also, on the Sony PS-HX500 there is no height calibration for the arm, that means the needle needs to be the same height as the stock needle. If it isn’t you will need to get a shorter or taller mat to compensate. Also, most importantly for the Sony PS-HX500, it does not have a removable headshell, instead the wire leads are straight from the tone arm. Only the cartridge is removable. So, there is even more to consider for your needle purchase. Depending on the height of the needle you may have to get a new mat for the difference in height.

So, scouring the internet high and low I narrowed it down to:

  • Ortofon 2M Bronze: pricey but I hear performs well. Maybe the next one.
  • Goldring 1006: I heard it also performs well on the Sony PS-HX500, but a little pricey in Canada compared to its cost in Britain and Europe.
  • Sumiko Pearl: my first choice initially. I worried about replacement needles for the future, as it was not widely available in Canada.

However, everywhere I turned the Nagaoka MP-110 was continually mentioned. Some enjoy the sound, while others think that for its deep bass and crisp highs, it sacrifices the mids. I considered it and thought if my primary use for the Sony is to mostly rip DJ records for digital copies, then good emphasis on the bass is probably a plus. I am not a fan of too much bass reproduction but sometimes you get better results dialing back the bass later, then adding bass to the recording.

I found the cheapest Nagaoka MP-110 in Canada (at the time) at Hifipro.ca and decided to make the purchase. Best case scenario: I like the results. Worst case scenario: I know it is probably going to be better than the stock cartridge that the Sony comes with.

Replacing The Cartridge On The Sony PS-HX500

Disclaimer: replacing the cartridge on the Sony PS-HX500 is notoriously difficult. Again, it doesn’t have a detachable headshell like many turntables you may or may not be familiar with. I thought I was prepared, having replaced cartridges with headshells in the past with ease. The wires however are very thin and very delicate, so proceed with caution. If you have any hesitation you may want to enquire with a stereo repair place to see how much they would charge to do it. Either way I am not responsible, you have been warned.

THings You WIll NEed

  • replacement cartridge (here a Nagaoka MP-110)
  • a clean surface
  • angled needle nose pliers (1 mm)
  • small phillips screwdriver (1 mm)
  • cartridge stylus alignment protractor
  • digital turntable stylus force scale gauge
  1. Place turntable on a clean, flat surface.
  2. Remove the lid from its hinges if attached.
  3. Clamp down the turntable arm, so it doesn’t move.

  4. Keep the cartridge attached, do not remove the screws from the cartridge yet.
  5. Remove the wires from old cartridge first, grabbing only the metal part with your angled needle nose pliers, apply pressure. Do not grip or touch the black rubber insulation nor the coloured wire itself.


  6. With light force pull the wire back off of the needle by the metal clasp. You must be careful not to grip too hard or the metal brackets will be squeezed and grip the pins. But also make sure not to lose grip or pull to hard. Doing so may separate the wire from the metal attachment. I almost broke one wire myself.
  7. Once all the wires are removed then you can detach the old cartridge by unscrewing the tiny screws on top of the headshell.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OVg_pX73TnQ
  8. Take off the cartridge, save all the screws and washers and replace the plastic cover for the needle (hopefully you kept it, always keep the cover).
  9. Remove new Nagaoka cartridge from its package.
  10. To install the The Nagaoka cartridge (in this scenario) it requires you to use the old washers that came with the turntable.
  11. Simply repeat the steps backwards: attach the needle to the headshell with the screws, then attach the wires to their perspective colours. Taking care to be gentle with the wires.
  12. Once the cartridge is attached, use your cartridge stylus alignment protractor to make sure needle is properly aligned outside and inside of the center of the platter.
  13. Finally use your digital turntable stylus force scale gauge to figure how much weight your needle weighs and how much counter weight and tracking you should use.
  14. Adjust cartridge, weight and tracking where needed.

Results / Reviews

So, far the Nagaoka MP-110 has been a great replacement needle for the Sony PS-HX500. Not only is of the relative same height, so I didn’t need to replace my mat, it also sonically sounds great. Delivering nice bass and good highs and much better staging than the previous needle. It should be noted that once your needle is installed you should give it 50 hours or so of listening to get optimal sound out of your new needle.

dougieboom.com

PreSonus Eris E3.5 Speakers For A Home DJ Set Up (Review)

A cheap (and cheerful) DJ booth monitor for your home DJ set up, the PreSonus Eris E3.5 Speaker.

Last year I was looking for a speaker monitor solution for my home DJ booth set up. I wanted a pair of small lightweight speaker monitors that offered relative good clarity for a small price. My intention was to hang the speakers over my DJ booth which sits close to a wall. So, I didn’t want huge speakers that jutted out too far (as to be too close to my ears), nor did I want the speakers to obstruct my DJ space. Furthermore, I didn’t want the speakers to be too heavy, as it would be harder to mount and didn’t want big heavy speakers precariously hanging over my gear. (I know, try mounting them properly). I do have a pair of QSC CP8 but even these for their small size seemed like overkill for this purpose, if I am just DJing in my small studio/dj room. Also, I didn’t want to have to dismantle the CP8 speakers every time I needed them for a gig. I was looking for in situ speakers that would be ready anytime I wanted to DJ or listen to records.


More DJ Tech reviews:
REVIEW: QSC CP8 SPEAKER – A DJ’S LIL BEST BUD?
TRACK FREEZE PROBLEM WITH ROLAND DJ-505 & REVIEW


For years, I would practice DJing or listening to records in my headphones almost exclusively. I still do often but you are really limiting your experience by not listening to music or DJing on speakers. There is something magical and sound altering that happens once music is played through the air. So, it is really important to experience both for perspective. Also, I realized that once I wanted to start making DJ mixes on vinyl again (without computers or screens), you need speakers to do “old school” cueing: previewing the next track in your headphones before you drop it into the main mix. This makes only using headphones problematic. So, that is when I decided I needed speakers to make analog DJ mixes.


Listen to Dougie Boom’s All-Vinyl Mixes!


Alternatively, for speakers I looked at the Pioneer DJ DM-40BT DJ Studio Monitors (only RCA inputs), the Mackie CR Series CR3-3-Inch (wow that some green colour) and the KRK Rokit 4 (that’s a lot of bass). However, after much consideration I went with the PreSonus Eris E3.5 Professional Multimedia Reference Monitors. Now, after a year of use I can say that I am happy with the purchase. The Eris E3.5 sound great! Good clarity and flexibility. I was worried that these speakers would not be much better than your conventional computer speakers. However, I was wrong and they have exceeded my expectations.

PreSonus Eris E3.5 Features

First off, these are not a bass heavy type of speaker. For that I would consider the KRK Rokits with its front ports are known to be a bassier speaker. If you are mostly listening to bass heavy music then you may prefer those instead. For me I was looking for something more neutral sounding. I own Yamaha Monitors for my studio and they are extremely flat but clear in their response (what you hear is what you get). That is not to say that the bass on these Eris do not meet my expectations. A smoother more subtle bass is delivered by the E3.5’s 3″ woven composite woofers. A 1″ silk dome tweeter offers clear highs that aren’t too harsh. The speakers are plenty loud at 25 watt/side power amplifier. Its more than enough volume, considering my use and its proximity. The E3.5’s are active (powered) so they don’t require an external mixer or a power amp.

The speakers have a low profile with a width of 5.6″ (141 mm), a depth of 6.4″ (162 mm) and a height 8.3″ (210 mm). The speaker cabinets themselves (I thought were plastic) are actually medium-density fiberboard with vinyl-laminate, so some of the sound is preserved.

The speaker with all the connections is powered and feeds to the other through speaker wire.

On the back it includes a stereo RCA input (unbalanced) but the real kicker is the inclusion of 1/4″ balanced inputs! A little bit unusual for a speaker of its size, most would use 1/8″ or RCA, but the choice to include them is so appreciated. I would say 60-70% of the DJ mixers or controllers out there have a 1/4″ outputs (for the booth outputs or otherwise), so hooking a DJ mixer with a stereo 1/4″ cable sounds great and is seamless. It includes two EQ controls on the back for highs and lows (-6dbs to + 6dbs). The AC port is a female C7 2-Pin style port, which is easily replaceable and non-proprietary.

On the front, we have the volume and power switch conveniently placed, making it easy to access. Most monitors usually have these controls on the back, but this works especially for our purpose of being wall-mounted. Also on the front there is the inclusion of a 1/8″ headphone jack and aux in jack, which both sound pretty good as well. The on light, although not adjustable in brightness, is a soft blue and will not burn holes in your eyes.

Your all I need to get by…..” The Eris speakers more than o-blige for your DJ room set up.

Presonus Eris E3.5 Conclusion

The Presonus Eris E3.5 have become more useful to me than expected! I use them now all the time: listening to my DJ blends, previewing finished mixes and songs, preparing for gigs, and listening and grading 45 records. Yes the Eris E3.5 are that discriminating in sound! You will hear the record with pops and all. But most importantly I hear great balanced sound coming from my Pioneer S9’s booth outs. Once you get the eq-ing right (from its controls on the back), taking in consideration the room and how far they are placed from the wall, just as you would normal studio monitors.

I was worried that the speakers would not be able to take the signal from my mixer without overloading or sounding terrible, but I was and still am really happy with them. Some critiques complained that the rear ports allow the bass to be absorbed by nearby walls. However, mounting them away from the wall with speaker mounts, gave them adequate space from the wall and eliminated that problem for me.

For mounting them, I used Primecables Speaker Wall Mounts, which are another bargain and are easy to set up. Plus they are Canadian company. You can tilt them to almost any specification and they hold up to 55 lbs, easy for the Eris’ 3.5 lbs each.

Lastly, it should be noted I would never consider the PreSonus Eris E3.5 as “gig” worthy speakers. These are more so for home/personal use as inexpensive but great sounding studio monitors. However, they make a great powered speaker solution for your home DJ set up. It should be noted these do not have bluetooth, which keeps these lower in cost. Instead, you get great sounding speaker for your money and, alternatively, you could easily attach a bluetooth receiver instead, and let’s face it, wireless technology will always get better.

PreSonus Eris E3.5 – Pros

-powered small speaker solution, which will work for most home DJ set ups.
-excellent sound (no glaring highs and nice smooth bass)
-great value. $150 CAD price well worth it.
-Proper 1/4″ inputs (which suits most DJ mixer’s booth outputs) but also has 1/8″ and RCA inputs as well.
-speakers this good could ultimately be used somewhere else if you upgrade (e.g. portable studio monitors).

PreSonus Eris E3.5 – Cons

-the supplied stereo speaker cord to connect between speakers could be longer (depending on your set up)
-EQ controls (pots) on the back feel cheap.
-Not an overtly bass-y pair of speakers, if you are going for a more club-heavy feel. Possible these could be paired with a subwoofer. However, it should be noted there are NO Subwoofer out ports.

dougieboom.com

Battle of The Bags: QSC’s CP8 Tote vs Gator GPA-TOTE8 for the QSC CP8 Speaker

Gator-QSC-CP8ppp
Side by side: The Gator GPA-TOTE8 & the QSC’s CP8 Tote for the CP8 Speaker

After my favourable review of the QSC CP8 speaker, I thought I would go one further and compare two options of tote bags to carry and protect the CP8 speaker. Since, the speaker is made of polypropylene (a hard plastic) and of some considerable weight, it is important to protect your QSC CP8 during transportation. The two most readily available options available to me (there are probably other options outside Canada) were: QSC’s own brand of tote bag, the QSC CP8 Tote (CP8Tote) or Gator’s Heavy Duty Speaker Tote for 8 inch speakers (GPA-TOTE8). So, does it make sense to buy the more expensive $100 (CAD) QSC CP8 Tote bag for your $600 CP8 speaker or will the $75 CAD Gator GPA-TOTE8 suffice?

Gator-GPATOTE8-handle
Getting a handle on what is the better bag for the QSC CP8 Speaker: the QSC CP8 TOTE (on the left) or the Gator GPA-TOTE8 (on the right).

QSC CP8 Tote

When I originally purchased the CP8 speaker, QSC’s own tote bag was my first choice of bag purchased. Functionally, it provided everything I needed in a tote bag. It was modelled for the QSC CP8, so the fit is snug. So snug, in fact, that it takes a little finessing to get it in. The outside of the bag is made of heavy-duty nylon / Cordura, which makes the bag light-weight but durable. The inside of the bag is covered with a soft lined PE foam padding which adds protection and is soft enough that it won’t scratch your speaker. The additional velcro pocket on the side provides enough room for the 9-foot power cable that the CP8 comes with, plus a little additional room (I was able to add an additional 6-foot TRS cable). The stitching is solid with straps that seem to take the weight of CP8, no problem. It has a convenient velcro flap on top to access the CP8’s top handle (as seen above).

QSC-CP8TOTE-side-pocket
The QSC CP8 Tote bag could fit the original 9-foot power cable for the CP8, plus a 6-foot TRS cable.

Gator GPA-TOTE8

Gator-GPATOTE8-side-pocket
The Gator GPA-TOTE8 could only fit the only fit the original power cable.

I was so impressed the CP8 speaker I purchased another. So, this time, I decided to instead purchase the Gator brand of 8 inch speaker bag to compare. The design is much the same as CP8 at a fraction of the cost (at a relative 3/4 the cost). It includes (like the QSC CP9-Tote): two straps, a side pocket, with access to the top handle of the speaker so it can be carried two ways (as a bag or by carrying the handle of the speaker itself). However, they differ slightly. The Gator is bigger in size and offers a little more room for the speaker, arguably this extra space could be to accommodate other models of 8 inch speaker. This extra space could be used to accommodate more chords perhaps, however this means that it’s not fitted specifically to the CP8 speaker, so its a little less secure with about an inch of space around the cabinet.

Contrarily, the side pocket on the Gator is smaller. I was only able to fit just the 6 foot power chord (no additional chords). Other physical differences, the flap to access the speaker handle on the Gator is a different design. Instead of a dedicated flap (like the one on the QSC bag), on the Gator, you need to unzip the bag’s main zippers a bit to access the top handle of your speaker. This may be an annoyance to some. As far as the construction, the Gator does not feel as sturdy. The slightly thinner carrying straps combined with the weight of CP8, make it feel not as stable as the QSC bag when you pick it up. Finally, the foam inside feels cheaper and is not as thick and protective as the QSC’s foam.

QSC CP8 Tote vs Gator GPA-TOTE8 – Conclusion

CP8-tote-bag-open
The Gator is more “accommodating” but is an inch of space (front, back and side) around the speaker too much?

So, does it make sense to buy the $100 (CAD) QSC CP8 Tote bag for the $600 CP8 speaker or does the $75 Gator GPA-TOTE8 suffice? In my opinion, I am going with the QSC’s own brand of tote, the CP8Tote, on this one. The Gator does not feel as “heavy duty” as its title proclaims (especially for the CP8 speaker). If maybe you aren’t going to move your speakers all that much and you want to keep them mostly dust free this may be your option. However, if you are like me and want (and plan) to move them often or as much as you like, I would say go with the QSC’s tote bag. It’s emblematic of the QSC which is a little overpriced but indispensable. Furthermore, the price is almost negligible compared to keeping and preserving your investment. Between the Gator and the QSC speaker tote you can feel the difference in cost and it may make the difference. I had high hopes for the Gator as I have one of their other bags (The G-MIXERBAG-0909) and it’s great. This one, however, falls a bit short as a bag for the QSC CP8 speaker.

QSC CP8 Tote

Good:

  • made specifically for the QSC CP8, good fit.
  • better quality build and materials (zipper, foam, nylon exterior).
  • bigger side pocket.
  • more sturdy.
  • better access to top handle of speaker.

Bad:

  • such a tight fit, it takes a bit of finessing
  • side pocket (although bigger than the Gator) could be even bigger
  • more expensive

Gator GPA-TOTE8

Good:

  • Slightly larger space, will fit more brands of speaker
  • more room inside for more cables
  • costs less

Bad:

  • padding is thinner (less protection)
  • CP8 sits more loosely in the bag with about an inch of space on the side, top, and front (less secure).
  • to access handle of your speaker, you more or less open the bag.
  • construction is cheaper.
  • materials are cheaper (foam, nylon shell, zippers, velcro)

Discogs: ‘Contact Form Disabled’ – How to Enable

contact-form-disabled-discogs-enableRecently, I had a Discogs user contact me that he was unable to send me messages to my Discogs store. He would get a red warning: “User ____ has their contact form disabled.” It is an easy fix (for the recipient), but is not worded as such and difficult to find on the internet. To enable your contact form on Discogs (the recipient must):

1. Log In to Discogs: https://auth.discogs.com/login

2. Go To Your Privacy Settings: www.discogs.com/settings/privacy

3. Click the ‘allow other members to contact me’ box.Enable-Contact-Form-Discogs

4. Save your settings by clicking the green ‘Save my privacy settings’ button.

5. You’re done!

 

Review: QSC CP8 Speaker – A DJ’s lil best bud?

Check out my review on tote bags for the QSC CP8

QSC CP8 Speaker Front
The QSC CP8 Speaker: Angelic glow and loud as…

Late last year QSC revealed a new series of speaker, the “CP” series, which touted the same QSC signature sound we would expect, in a more affordable and lighter incarnation. Now, plenty was written in anticipation but not many reviews have surfaced out there. Particularly, for my intended purpose, which is how does it perform as a speaker monitor for DJing (for mobile set ups) and maybe as a secondary solution to a full rig?

Now, I should not have to explain why a speaker monitor for DJing is important, but I find I have to all the time (lol) to: wedding planners, restaurant owners, brides and grooms, my girlfriend, sound-techs, and even other DJs (I thought we were in this together). The answer is simple: DJ’s need to hear what is going on, more than anyone else in the room in order to perform. It is not unlike any other type of musician/performer. Timing, volume, pitch, tempo are all factors that are important to DJs or at least should be. Digital DJing is definitely more forgiving in that respect, you can almost DJ with your eyes now but ultimately we need to hear what we are doing, no interpretation. That is why any DJ mixer worth its salt has at least one “booth out” output. Now, there are some cases, as a DJ, where you are positioned close enough to a speaker where you are, more or less, hearing it the same way your audience is. More often, however, you may not be near a speaker, it may be positioned away from you or perhaps you are isolated from your audience almost altogether. I remember playing an early gig with kQuattro (1/2 of the duo was Egyptrixx, now ACT!) and Crystal Castles (RIP) and I was playing in a closet (pretty much) before the kitchen with the speakers and audience in another room. Every time someone would come out of the kitchen I would get hit with the swinging door: how am I sounding? In a more recent example, I played the Design Exchange in downtown Toronto. Huge space! However, the audio vendor would not provide stage monitors. We are talking $300,000+ worth of equipment, but fair enough. Furthermore, the reality is DJs are often an afterthought to establishments. Their makeshift booths don’t consider the things that DJs need, including an adequate amount of space and a speaker close enough to hear what you are doing. In some cases, you may need to hear the music louder than your audience does to get the mix right, for example in a restaurant or playing a wedding reception.

So, having a monitor for DJing is invaluable. Personally, I kept holding out for a 8″ to 10″ speaker that was lightweight and could wedge (perfect for the urban DJ to jump in your car service with). You would be surprised how little options there are. For example, the Yamaha DBR10 and Yamaha DXR8 which sound great, albeit a more flatter-true to the sound response, do not set up as a wedge, otherwise they would have been a contender. The JBL EON610 is kind of ugly, if you want to use as a secondary P.A., and JBLs sound (in my experience) is just ok: loud but can get brash (convince me otherwise in comments). There is of course the QSC K8, which is not a bad option but because it is discontinued you may have to go secondhand (i.e. no warranty for an expensive item).  Its newer replacement the K8.2 are a good option, but they are  for many, a rather expensive indulgence for the main purpose of a DJ speaker monitor at almost double the cost of the CP8s. However, even in a city as “world class” as Toronto, being able to hear them in the flesh is tough, no floor models anywhere. So, I decided to take the plunge so you don’t have to.

QSC-CP8-Speaker-Size-Comparison
Compared to the universal DJ ruler (a milkcrate) The QSC CP8 is approximately the same size.

First Impressions

It is of small stature and width but has a good weight to it. That is, enough weight to feel substantial but an easy pick up. There is no side handle but a top handle. Although, it should be relatively easy to take on an and off a speaker pole. The hard plastic (polypropylene) outer shell feels nice and solid. When you hear “plastic” you fear the worst but it feels solid, hopefully it withstands the test of time and doesn’t scratch easily. It is the perfect size for a booth speaker where space is often limited. Being able to set up 5 ways is nice: vertically on a tabletop; horizontally flat on one side or as a wedge on the other side; on a speaker pole (35mm); or they have a yoke / wallmount kit for installing to a wall. For the audio we have 3 inputs: two (x2) mic / line inputs; one (x1) 3.5mm input for a mp3 player and one (x1) xlr output to link the signal (post gain) to additional speakers. That is enough inputs to do smaller demo size setups or perhaps for weddings, small ceremony or a smaller reception room. Is it enough power though?

QSC CP8 Speaker Back with Inputs
The QSC CP8 has lots of inputs: Two (x2) TRS 1/4″/XLR inputs; even a 1/8″ 3.5mm input.

The QSC C9 boasts a 1000 watt Class D Amplifier, the same as its larger version the CP12. It does not have full control of the EQ rather it has six (x6) different EQ presets. On the first power up I would say it definitely met my expectations and surpassed them! This thing is loud with good clarity! As a monitor, placed facing towards me, I put the CP8’s volume at 8 o’clock (2 clicks) and 9 o’clock (2 clicks) on my booth output from the Pioneer S9 mixer and it was comfortable room-level listening and it only went up from there.

As far as the EQ setting I preferred the default setting. I got really good clarity (highs, mid, lows) testing a vinyl record. The more I turned it up, in the confines of my small studio, the more it scared me how loud it got (hello neighbours). The dance setting added more bass but I felt it was a little bit muddled (your audience will probably not know). However, I don’t really see that as its purpose, as full P.A. solution. I think this is best suited as a monitor;  an additional speaker for filling up a room; or as tops with the addition of a sub (there are EQ settings that drop the bass on the CP8 to accommodate a sub). However, if your client is on a smaller budget maybe 2 of these in a small setting would be adequate.

As a speaker wedge on the floor by my feet, it performed well. It has a 90 degrees of sound dispersion, which makes it ideal for this use. I had this placed maybe a foot away from me on the ground and could hear it no problem. The speaker was more or less pointing at my lower torso but could still hear it. I would say ideally at around 2-3 feet away from where you are standing (depending on your height) it would be pointing directly at your ear.

Update: Recently, I used the QSC CP8 as a DJ booth monitor for a wedding (250 people, 30 foot high ceilings, a pretty big room and it did a great job. When I arrived, being unfamiliar with the venue, I had to walk around for a bit to find the room I was playing in but I did not break a sweat or my back carrying it around. May buy another in the future to see how it fairs for a P.A. with a subwoofer.

Pros:

  • A more affordable QSC speaker that does not sacrifice sound.
  • Compact design that will fit most DJ booths.
  • Has a 90 degrees of sound dispersion, which makes it ideal for a wedge by your feet. Even at a foot away I could hear what I was doing.
  • Loud enough for small crowds.

Cons:

  • Very little
  • Warranty is only 3 years compared to their usual 6 for other speakers. *Be sure to register online to qualify, otherwise it’s only one (1) year.

Check out my additional review on tote bags for the QSC CP8