Just in time for Summer… New DJ Mix ‘CABIN FEVER’! — Dougie Boom’s Cottage Country Mix

The walls are closing in, the temperature is rising and a bear is drinking all the beer. This is definitely a case of full blown Saturday night live cabin fever. Here at cottagemixtape.com, we have you covered. In the tradition of the Cottage Country Mix series, Dougie Boom has put together a mix of Rock […]

Just in time for Summer… New DJ Mix ‘CABIN FEVER’! — Dougie Boom’s Cottage Country Mix

TBT: Rosalie And Trevor’s Wedding @ Toronto Reference Library

More than words: Rosalie and Trevor looking lovely on their wedding I had the pleasure of DJing. photo by BKH Photo.

Throwing back to one of my favourite weddings I had the pleasure of playing in last year 2019. My longtime friend Trevor, who was a big early supporter of my DJ career, and his beloved Rosalie asked me to play their wedding and I was so humbled I had to say yes (“I dooooooo!”) The whole event was covered in Toronto Life and (your truly, Dougie Boom) was mentioned in the credits.

Trevor and Rosalie’s wedding was “real” fun. Read about it at TorontoLife.com.
Looking up to see the bride you got an appreciation of the size of the space.

It was a glamorous affair, Rosalie looked lovely in her dress and Trevor (not being totally outdone) looked sharp as well. What was great and unusual was the space, the wedding took place at the Bloor and Yonge Toronto Reference Library. It was my first time playing there and I was very impressed. The ceremony took place on the ground floor foyer and the bride made her dramatic entrance by taking the glass elevator down to her eagerly awaiting husband to be. The entrance music, a string version of Toto’s “Africa” by Vyne String Quartet, and the elevator were perfectly timed, giving the couple ample time to collect their thoughts before the proceedings got underway.

Trevor & Rosalie making memories with friends on the dance floor. Photo by BKH Photo from TorontoLife.com .

The guest and family were all in good spirits throughout the dinner with speeches that segued into a great evening of dancing. The floor never ceased with one couple telling me that if they hadn’t already been married, they would want me to play their wedding. Well there is always the anniversary party. I will play yours too, Trevor and Rosalie 😉

Dougie Boom in Hamilton at 1101 CafeBar February 7th

Playing an all 45/ 7″ set at 1101 Cafebar Feb. 7 (osten1101.com)

Very excited to announce I will be playing in Hamilton at 1101 CafeBar on Friday Feb 7th. Playing an all 45 set but not before eating and drinking next door at Osten Beerhall. 1101 and Osten is the new spot brought to you by homies Mark (ex-Royale’s Luncheonette) and Robert (Block Univers, Sixtoo, Megasoid) .

Expect to hear a little of everything: disco, house, hip hop, funk, electro, industrial all on 45. Small records big sound!

So if you were thinking of making the pilgrimage or are living Hamilton come through!

Dougie Boom @ 1101 Cafebar
Friday, February 7th, 2020
1101 Cannon St E,
Hamilton. Ontario

dougieboom.com

Step Into The New Year! with a New Jack Swing Mix by Dougie Boom

Happy New Year everybody! Now, between making plans for a new Cottage Country mix series and locking down dates for the rest of the new year. I thought I would put this mix together before the hits of 2020 start rolling and rewind it a bit. So let’s go back…back into time…back to the late 80’s early 90′ for this. I always wanted to do an ALL 45 / 7″ New Jack Swing mix.

What is New Jack Swing? New Jack Swing is a style of music that existed from about 1986 to 1992 that blended black R&B, pop and Hip Hop (with its origins in groups like New Edition and songs like Doug E Fresh’s “The Show” & Slick Rick’s “Children’s Story”). The name ‘New Jack Swing’ was chosen because the beats characteristically swung with almost a DC Go-Go feel (another musical form at the time). The sound became hugely popular with songs like “Poison” by Bel Biv Devoe and Boys II Men “Motownphilly” (which starts this mix) crossing over to broader audiences. Even across the world the sound was popular, in fact a lot of the 45s used in this mix were from Europe. In fact, a lot of New Jack Swing 45s are European only releases (as the US market began to move towards digital media).

Some of the defining producers of the genre are Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis (particularly early on) and of course super producer Teddy Riley, who would eventually come “full swing” and define 90’s hip hop (pushing that genre into the pop stratosphere). So, whether you like it or not, we live in a post -New Jack Swing world (at least in terms of pop music and culture). Gangster rap would turn out to dominate New Jack Swing as hip hop’s wimpier cousin but pop music has never quite gotten over New Jack Swing. You can hear it into the late 90’s with “Backstreet’s Back” sounding exactly like Prince’s “My Name Is Prince” and more obviously Britney Spears’ 2004 cover of “My Prerogative”. I can remember Bobby Brown’s original being a favourite of my older sister and, in contrast, my Dad thinking it was hilarious (a sort of generational cry for independence).

So here it is Dougie Boom X New Jack Swing X 45s vinyl = NEW JACK SCHWING!

New Jack Schwing Mix by Dougie Boom

Tracklisting:

Boys II Men – Motownphilly
Another Bad Creation – Iesha
Joe Public – Live & Learn
TLC ‎– What About Your Friends
Wrecks-N-Effect ‎– New Jack Swing
Bel Biv Devoe – Do Me!
Redhead Kingpin And The F.B.I. ‎– Do The Right Thing
Bobby Brown ‎– My Prerogative
Father MC – Lisa Baby
Janet Jackson – Nasty Boys
Levert – Pull Over
Johnny Gill ‎– Rub You The Right Way
Tony! Toni! Toné! ‎– Feels Good
Jane Child ‎– Don’t Wanna Fall In Love
Cameo – Candy

New Dougie Boom Megamix Names Names…His-self


Recently, I celebrated my birthday and thought it would be a good time to invite all my friends: DMX, Will Smith, Shaggy, etc and make a mix with my name all over it. I also added some classic movie clips with “Doug”: 21 Jump Street, Fast Times At Ridgemont High, The Hangover, etc. Hear the results at here at dougieboom.com .

Dougie Boom MEgamix

John Lee Hooker – “Boom Boom”
Lil’ Will – “My Dougie”
Young Problemz & Mike Jones – “Boi!”
General Degree –  “Boom Boom”
Spice – “So Mi Like It”
DMX feat. Mr. Vegas & Sean Paul – “Top Shotter”
P.O.D. “Boom”
Doug E Fresh & The Get Fresh Crew – “The Show”
LL Cool J – “Mama Said Knock You Out”
Shaquille O’Neal – “Boom!”
Fresh Prince – “Boom! Shake The Room”
Charli XCX – “Boom Clap”
Snoop Dogg feat. T-Pain – “Boom”
L’Trimm – “Cars That Go Boom”
The Egyptian Lover – “And My Beat Goes Boom”
Soundmaster T – “2 Much Booty In The Pants (Boom Shaka Mix)”
The Outhere Brothers x Kastra x Martin Garrix – “Boom Boom Proxy (Kastra Bootleg)”
Paul Lekakis – “Boom Boom (Let’s Go Back To My Room)”
Just A Band & Octa Push – “Boom Boom Boom”
The Boys From The Bottom – “Boom I Got Your Girlfriend”
California Swag District – “Teach Me How To Dougie (Promo Only Clean Edit)”
SBTRKT – “Ready Set Loop”
Addison Groove – “I Go Boom (DJ Rashad Remix)”
Shaggy – “Mr. Boombastic”
Prince – “Musicology”

Battle of The Bags: QSC’s CP8 Tote vs Gator GPA-TOTE8 for the QSC CP8 Speaker

Gator-QSC-CP8ppp
Side by side: The Gator GPA-TOTE8 & the QSC’s CP8 Tote for the CP8 Speaker

After my favourable review of the QSC CP8 speaker, I thought I would go one further and compare two options of tote bags to carry and protect the CP8 speaker. Since, the speaker is made of polypropylene (a hard plastic) and of some considerable weight, it is important to protect your QSC CP8 during transportation. The two most readily available options available to me (there are probably other options outside Canada) were: QSC’s own brand of tote bag, the QSC CP8 Tote (CP8Tote) or Gator’s Heavy Duty Speaker Tote for 8 inch speakers (GPA-TOTE8). So, does it make sense to buy the more expensive $100 (CAD) QSC CP8 Tote bag for your $600 CP8 speaker or will the $75 CAD Gator GPA-TOTE8 suffice?

Gator-GPATOTE8-handle
Getting a handle on what is the better bag for the QSC CP8 Speaker: the QSC CP8 TOTE (on the left) or the Gator GPA-TOTE8 (on the right).

QSC CP8 Tote

When I originally purchased the CP8 speaker, QSC’s own tote bag was my first choice of bag purchased. Functionally, it provided everything I needed in a tote bag. It was modelled for the QSC CP8, so the fit is snug. So snug, in fact, that it takes a little finessing to get it in. The outside of the bag is made of heavy-duty nylon / Cordura, which makes the bag light-weight but durable. The inside of the bag is covered with a soft lined PE foam padding which adds protection and is soft enough that it won’t scratch your speaker. The additional velcro pocket on the side provides enough room for the 9-foot power cable that the CP8 comes with, plus a little additional room (I was able to add an additional 6-foot TRS cable). The stitching is solid with straps that seem to take the weight of CP8, no problem. It has a convenient velcro flap on top to access the CP8’s top handle (as seen above).

QSC-CP8TOTE-side-pocket
The QSC CP8 Tote bag could fit the original 9-foot power cable for the CP8, plus a 6-foot TRS cable.

Gator GPA-TOTE8

Gator-GPATOTE8-side-pocket
The Gator GPA-TOTE8 could only fit the only fit the original power cable.

I was so impressed the CP8 speaker I purchased another. So, this time, I decided to instead purchase the Gator brand of 8 inch speaker bag to compare. The design is much the same as CP8 at a fraction of the cost (at a relative 3/4 the cost). It includes (like the QSC CP9-Tote): two straps, a side pocket, with access to the top handle of the speaker so it can be carried two ways (as a bag or by carrying the handle of the speaker itself). However, they differ slightly. The Gator is bigger in size and offers a little more room for the speaker, arguably this extra space could be to accommodate other models of 8 inch speaker. This extra space could be used to accommodate more chords perhaps, however this means that it’s not fitted specifically to the CP8 speaker, so its a little less secure with about an inch of space around the cabinet.

Contrarily, the side pocket on the Gator is smaller. I was only able to fit just the 6 foot power chord (no additional chords). Other physical differences, the flap to access the speaker handle on the Gator is a different design. Instead of a dedicated flap (like the one on the QSC bag), on the Gator, you need to unzip the bag’s main zippers a bit to access the top handle of your speaker. This may be an annoyance to some. As far as the construction, the Gator does not feel as sturdy. The slightly thinner carrying straps combined with the weight of CP8, make it feel not as stable as the QSC bag when you pick it up. Finally, the foam inside feels cheaper and is not as thick and protective as the QSC’s foam.

QSC CP8 Tote vs Gator GPA-TOTE8 – Conclusion

CP8-tote-bag-open
The Gator is more “accommodating” but is an inch of space (front, back and side) around the speaker too much?

So, does it make sense to buy the $100 (CAD) QSC CP8 Tote bag for the $600 CP8 speaker or does the $75 Gator GPA-TOTE8 suffice? In my opinion, I am going with the QSC’s own brand of tote, the CP8Tote, on this one. The Gator does not feel as “heavy duty” as its title proclaims (especially for the CP8 speaker). If maybe you aren’t going to move your speakers all that much and you want to keep them mostly dust free this may be your option. However, if you are like me and want (and plan) to move them often or as much as you like, I would say go with the QSC’s tote bag. It’s emblematic of the QSC which is a little overpriced but indispensable. Furthermore, the price is almost negligible compared to keeping and preserving your investment. Between the Gator and the QSC speaker tote you can feel the difference in cost and it may make the difference. I had high hopes for the Gator as I have one of their other bags (The G-MIXERBAG-0909) and it’s great. This one, however, falls a bit short as a bag for the QSC CP8 speaker.

QSC CP8 Tote

Good:

  • made specifically for the QSC CP8, good fit.
  • better quality build and materials (zipper, foam, nylon exterior).
  • bigger side pocket.
  • more sturdy.
  • better access to top handle of speaker.

Bad:

  • such a tight fit, it takes a bit of finessing
  • side pocket (although bigger than the Gator) could be even bigger
  • more expensive

Gator GPA-TOTE8

Good:

  • Slightly larger space, will fit more brands of speaker
  • more room inside for more cables
  • costs less

Bad:

  • padding is thinner (less protection)
  • CP8 sits more loosely in the bag with about an inch of space on the side, top, and front (less secure).
  • to access handle of your speaker, you more or less open the bag.
  • construction is cheaper.
  • materials are cheaper (foam, nylon shell, zippers, velcro)

New Cottage Country Mix Vol 22 for 2019! — Dougie Boom’s Cottage Country Mix

Here we are in our eleventh year, 93.5 Loon, and we proudly present Dougie Boom’s Cottage Country Vol. 22. Dropping the double deuce on ya. Tonight we going to party like it was last night, Tonight we are going to party like it is the last night. cottagemixtape.com

via New Cottage Country Mix Vol 22 for 2019! — Dougie Boom’s Cottage Country Mix

Rihanna – James Joint (420 Remix by Dougie Boom)

https://dougieboom.bandcamp.com/track/james-joint-420-remix-by-dougie-boom

Happy 420!

To celebrate I made a little remix of Rihanna’s “James Joint” (420 Remix by Dougie Boom). Available for free until I workout the kinks:

https://dougieboom.bandcamp.com/track/james-joint-420-remix-by-dougie-boom

All to celebrate tonight’s festivities at:


Stuck On Stupid 4/20
w/ The FranDiscos! + Fase & Dougie Boom
At The Drake Hotel
April 20, 2019

 

The Best Of Wax Trax! On Wax – a label tribute mix by Dougie Boom

Cover for Best Of Wax Trax! On Wax - a mix by Dougie Boom
Available for streaming on my mixcloud: http://www.mixcloud.com/DougieBoom

Calling all closet goths, old/new wavers, tough guys and bomb gang girls! Here is a tribute mix I made of arguably one of the greatest labels of all time, Wax Trax! Records (Chicago). (www.waxtrax.com)

Wax Trax! is among the pantheon of select Chicago labels (I would include Chess Records, Trax Records, Touch & Go, etc.) that did more than simply put out records, they created a sound.  Charting unknown territory in dance, punk, new wave and alternative rock they created something much more interesting than the some of their parts. “Industrial” yes but, in retrospect and especially listening back to this mix, it just seems to narrow a definition: proto-techno, proto-idm? Simply put, they released some of the hardest dance music you could find then, in the mid 80s to early 90s. It’s no coincidence that many techno and house producers (e.g. Carl Craig, Jeff Mills, etc.) have noted Wax Trax! or their roster as a big influence. So, what more can be said about Wax Trax that hasn’t been said or probably won’t be covered in the upcoming documentary, Industrial Accident, The Story Of Wax Trax Records? I guess my own personal take here with the music itself. As a collector and a fan I was buying Wax Trax! Records as soon as I started buying records.  So, this mix is a labour of love, years in the making: an ALL VINYL to tribute to WAX TRAX!

The Best Of Wax Trax! On Wax – a label tribute mix by Dougie Boom

Tracklisting:

PTP – Rubber Glove Seduction
T.G.T. – Revo (The Continuum MIx)
Front 242 – Take One
Clock DVA – Sound Mirror
KMFDM – Godlike (12” Mix)
My Life With The Thrill Kill Kult – Devil Does Drugs
Ministry – Everyday Is Halloween
Acid Horse – No Name, No Slogan
1000 Homo DJs – Supernaut
Laibach – Geburt Einer Nation
Foetus – Butterfly Potion
Lead Into Gold – Faster Than Light
Front Line Assembly – Digital Tension
Front 242 – Headhunter V1.0
Ajax – Mind The Gap
My Life With The Thrill Kill Kult – Kooler Than Jesus
Greater Than One – I Don’t Need God
Front 242 – Welcome To Paradise
Meat Beat Manifesto – God O.D
Coil – The Snow (Answers Come In Dreams II)
The KLF – What Time Is Love (12” Version)
M.E.S.H. – Meet Every Situation Headon
Fini Tribe – I Want More (Row, Row, Row The Mix)
Revolting Cocks – Attack Ships On Fire
Ministry – Primental
T.A.G.C. – Broadcast Test (Transmission 1)
Front Line Assembly – Iceolate
A Split Second – Flesh
Jass – Theme (Dub)
Greater Than One – Utopia AA
Revolting Cocks – Stainless Steel Providers

 

Review: QSC CP8 Speaker – A DJ’s lil best bud?

Check out my review on tote bags for the QSC CP8

QSC CP8 Speaker Front
The QSC CP8 Speaker: Angelic glow and loud as…

Late last year QSC revealed a new series of speaker, the “CP” series, which touted the same QSC signature sound we would expect, in a more affordable and lighter incarnation. Now, plenty was written in anticipation but not many reviews have surfaced out there. Particularly, for my intended purpose, which is how does it perform as a speaker monitor for DJing (for mobile set ups) and maybe as a secondary solution to a full rig?

Now, I should not have to explain why a speaker monitor for DJing is important, but I find I have to all the time (lol) to: wedding planners, restaurant owners, brides and grooms, my girlfriend, sound-techs, and even other DJs (I thought we were in this together). The answer is simple: DJ’s need to hear what is going on, more than anyone else in the room in order to perform. It is not unlike any other type of musician/performer. Timing, volume, pitch, tempo are all factors that are important to DJs or at least should be. Digital DJing is definitely more forgiving in that respect, you can almost DJ with your eyes now but ultimately we need to hear what we are doing, no interpretation. That is why any DJ mixer worth its salt has at least one “booth out” output. Now, there are some cases, as a DJ, where you are positioned close enough to a speaker where you are, more or less, hearing it the same way your audience is. More often, however, you may not be near a speaker, it may be positioned away from you or perhaps you are isolated from your audience almost altogether. I remember playing an early gig with kQuattro (1/2 of the duo was Egyptrixx, now ACT!) and Crystal Castles (RIP) and I was playing in a closet (pretty much) before the kitchen with the speakers and audience in another room. Every time someone would come out of the kitchen I would get hit with the swinging door: how am I sounding? In a more recent example, I played the Design Exchange in downtown Toronto. Huge space! However, the audio vendor would not provide stage monitors. We are talking $300,000+ worth of equipment, but fair enough. Furthermore, the reality is DJs are often an afterthought to establishments. Their makeshift booths don’t consider the things that DJs need, including an adequate amount of space and a speaker close enough to hear what you are doing. In some cases, you may need to hear the music louder than your audience does to get the mix right, for example in a restaurant or playing a wedding reception.

So, having a monitor for DJing is invaluable. Personally, I kept holding out for a 8″ to 10″ speaker that was lightweight and could wedge (perfect for the urban DJ to jump in your car service with). You would be surprised how little options there are. For example, the Yamaha DBR10 and Yamaha DXR8 which sound great, albeit a more flatter-true to the sound response, do not set up as a wedge, otherwise they would have been a contender. The JBL EON610 is kind of ugly, if you want to use as a secondary P.A., and JBLs sound (in my experience) is just ok: loud but can get brash (convince me otherwise in comments). There is of course the QSC K8, which is not a bad option but because it is discontinued you may have to go secondhand (i.e. no warranty for an expensive item).  Its newer replacement the K8.2 are a good option, but they are  for many, a rather expensive indulgence for the main purpose of a DJ speaker monitor at almost double the cost of the CP8s. However, even in a city as “world class” as Toronto, being able to hear them in the flesh is tough, no floor models anywhere. So, I decided to take the plunge so you don’t have to.

QSC-CP8-Speaker-Size-Comparison
Compared to the universal DJ ruler (a milkcrate) The QSC CP8 is approximately the same size.

First Impressions

It is of small stature and width but has a good weight to it. That is, enough weight to feel substantial but an easy pick up. There is no side handle but a top handle. Although, it should be relatively easy to take on an and off a speaker pole. The hard plastic (polypropylene) outer shell feels nice and solid. When you hear “plastic” you fear the worst but it feels solid, hopefully it withstands the test of time and doesn’t scratch easily. It is the perfect size for a booth speaker where space is often limited. Being able to set up 5 ways is nice: vertically on a tabletop; horizontally flat on one side or as a wedge on the other side; on a speaker pole (35mm); or they have a yoke / wallmount kit for installing to a wall. For the audio we have 3 inputs: two (x2) mic / line inputs; one (x1) 3.5mm input for a mp3 player and one (x1) xlr output to link the signal (post gain) to additional speakers. That is enough inputs to do smaller demo size setups or perhaps for weddings, small ceremony or a smaller reception room. Is it enough power though?

QSC CP8 Speaker Back with Inputs
The QSC CP8 has lots of inputs: Two (x2) TRS 1/4″/XLR inputs; even a 1/8″ 3.5mm input.

The QSC C9 boasts a 1000 watt Class D Amplifier, the same as its larger version the CP12. It does not have full control of the EQ rather it has six (x6) different EQ presets. On the first power up I would say it definitely met my expectations and surpassed them! This thing is loud with good clarity! As a monitor, placed facing towards me, I put the CP8’s volume at 8 o’clock (2 clicks) and 9 o’clock (2 clicks) on my booth output from the Pioneer S9 mixer and it was comfortable room-level listening and it only went up from there.

As far as the EQ setting I preferred the default setting. I got really good clarity (highs, mid, lows) testing a vinyl record. The more I turned it up, in the confines of my small studio, the more it scared me how loud it got (hello neighbours). The dance setting added more bass but I felt it was a little bit muddled (your audience will probably not know). However, I don’t really see that as its purpose, as full P.A. solution. I think this is best suited as a monitor;  an additional speaker for filling up a room; or as tops with the addition of a sub (there are EQ settings that drop the bass on the CP8 to accommodate a sub). However, if your client is on a smaller budget maybe 2 of these in a small setting would be adequate.

As a speaker wedge on the floor by my feet, it performed well. It has a 90 degrees of sound dispersion, which makes it ideal for this use. I had this placed maybe a foot away from me on the ground and could hear it no problem. The speaker was more or less pointing at my lower torso but could still hear it. I would say ideally at around 2-3 feet away from where you are standing (depending on your height) it would be pointing directly at your ear.

Update: Recently, I used the QSC CP8 as a DJ booth monitor for a wedding (250 people, 30 foot high ceilings, a pretty big room and it did a great job. When I arrived, being unfamiliar with the venue, I had to walk around for a bit to find the room I was playing in but I did not break a sweat or my back carrying it around. May buy another in the future to see how it fairs for a P.A. with a subwoofer.

Pros:

  • A more affordable QSC speaker that does not sacrifice sound.
  • Compact design that will fit most DJ booths.
  • Has a 90 degrees of sound dispersion, which makes it ideal for a wedge by your feet. Even at a foot away I could hear what I was doing.
  • Loud enough for small crowds.

Cons:

  • Very little
  • Warranty is only 3 years compared to their usual 6 for other speakers. *Be sure to register online to qualify, otherwise it’s only one (1) year.

Check out my additional review on tote bags for the QSC CP8